Annona Species (Fruits that I miss)

mistyleafStarred Page By mistyleaf, 28th Apr 2012 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/3bvy48sc/
Posted in Wikinut>Reviews>Food

"Annona is a genus of flowering plants in the pawpaw/sugar apple family, Annonaceae. Annona species are grown for domestic or commercial use, mostly for the edible and nutritious fruits. Many of the species are used in traditional medicines for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Several annonacaeous species have been found to contain acetogenins, a class of natural compounds with a wide variety of biological activities."

Introduction

As I was surfing the net, I came across some fruits which I have not eaten for years. Since I came to Japan, I really miss the fruits I used to eat in my country. Some of them are the annona species.
According to wikipedia, "Annona is a genus of flowering plants in the pawpaw/sugar apple family, Annonaceae.
The generic name derives from anón, a Hispaniolan Taíno word for the fruit.
Annona species are taprooted, evergreen or semideciduous, tropical trees or shrubs.This fruit typically grows in areas which do not get below 28 degrees like Cuba, Jamaica, and the Philippines. However it has been known to grow in certain areas of Florida."

flower

Annona Reticulata or Custard Apple

Custard Apple trees are large and spreading, shaded by large, green drooping leaves. The tree is popular as a rootstock for other Annona species.
The tree sets many light yellow trumpet shaped flowers that emit a pungent, sweet smell especially in the late afternoon when the male pollen sacks burst open. Of these flowers, only a small number will set fruit.
The custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but it was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. It has long been cultivated and naturalized as far south as Peru and Brazil. It is commonly grown in the Bahamas and occasionally in Bermuda and southern Florida.
Apparently it was introduced into tropical Africa early in the 17th century and it is grown in South Africa as a dooryard fruit tree. In India the tree is cultivated, especially around Calcutta, and runs wild in many areas. It has become fairly common on the east coast of Malaya, and more or less throughout Southeast Asia and the Philippines though nowhere particularly esteemed. Eighty years ago it was reported as thoroughly naturalized in Guam.
It is called anonas in the Philippines.


Annona reticulata

The fruit

Compound fruit 4" to 6" in diameter, roundish to heart-shaped to irregular. Tough, thin skin may be yellow to brown to red when ripe. . Red fruits sometimes have pink flesh or red lines running through the flesh.
There is a thick, cream-white layer of custardlike, somewhat granular, flesh beneath the skin surrounding the concolorous moderately juicy segments. A pointed, fibrous, central core, attached to the thick stem, extends more than halfway through the fruit. Taste varies, best are sweet, juicy with a distinctive flavor.

Custard apples are also rich in vitamin B6 and potassium, copper and have plenty of dietary fiber, which is good for keeping the digestive tract healthy and aids digestion as well prevents constipation. They have low levels of fat, which is good for health.
It is believed that a paste made with the creamy flesh of the fruit can be used as a balm to treat boils, abscesses and ulcers.
They can be sun-dried and then grind into a powder, which can treat dysentery and diarrhea. They also act as coolants, stimulants and expectorants. They are good for treating anemia.
Some people make the fruit into a beverage that can act as a substitute to milk.
Even the bark of the custard apple tree, which contains astringents and tannins, is used in making herbal medicines. The leaves are supposed to be good for treating cancer and tumors; while the bark can relieve toothaches and gum pain.
The unripe fruit is dried and powdered and is used as a cure for treating lice. The fruit is high in calorie content but contains minerals like iron, phosphorous, calcium and riboflavin.

Annona Squamosa or Sugar Apple

Small, deciduous tree to 15-25ft, spreading to the same size. Trees loose leaves in the winter for about 4-6 weeks. Leaves are 6-8" long. Flowers appear with new leaf growth in early spring. Fruits ripen 3-4 months later throughout summer and fall. The common sugar apple has a green skin but dark red varieties are becoming more commonplace.

The original home of the sugar apple is unknown. It is commonly cultivated in tropical South America, not often in Central America, very frequently in southern Mexico, the West Indies, Bahamas and Bermuda, and occasionally in southern Florida. In Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Barbados, and in dry regions of North Queensland, Australia, it has escaped from cultivation and is found wild in pastures, forests and along roadsides.
The Spaniards probably carried seeds from the New World to the Philippines and the Portuguese are assumed to have introduced the sugar apple to southern India before 1590. It was growing in Indonesia early in the 17 th century and has been widely adopted in southern China, Queensland, Australia, Polynesia, Hawaii, tropical Africa, Egypt and the lowlands of Palestine. Cultivation is most extensive in India where the tree is also very common as an escape and the fruit exceedingly popular and abundant in markets. The sugar apple is one of the most important fruits in the interior of Brazil.
As it is found in many cultures, it is also known by many different names.
The common names: sugar apple, sweetsop, scaly custard apple, custard apple, zuckerapfel, stachelanone, cherimoya, attier, poreroe cannelle, pomme cannelle, anon, anon de azucar, anona de castilla, fruta do conde, scopappel, kaneelappel, fan-li-chi, sirkaja, sarikaja, atis, ata, luna, meba, sharifa, sarifa, sitaphal, sita pandu, nona sri kaya, bnah nona, seri kaya, tiep baay, tiep, mang cau ta, noinah, manonah, makkhiap, lanang, mak khbieb, na, mang caua ta, qu a naIn
InIndia, the sugar apple is known as the sita fruit, which is to denote a fruit that has too many seeds.

Pollination in the Philippines is done by a fruit bat that consumes this fruit who would then spread the seeds from island to island. It is called atis in the Philippines.

The fruit

The compound fruit is nearly round, ovoid, or conical; 2 1/3 to 4 in (6-10 cm) long; its thick rind composed of knobby segments, pale-green, gray-green, bluish-green, or, in one form, dull, deep-pink externally (nearly always with a bloom); separating when the fruit is ripe and revealing the mass of conically segmented, creamy-white, glistening, delightfully fragrant, juicy, sweet, delicious flesh. Many of the segments enclose a single oblong-cylindric, black or dark-brown seed about 1/2 in (1.25 cm) long. There may be a total of 20 to 38, or perhaps more, seeds in the average fruit. Some trees, however, bear seedless fruits.The fruit contains about 16-18% sugar, it is used mainly for desserts, and can be mixed with wine, ice cream, or milk.

In India the crushed leaves are sniffed to overcome hysteria and fainting spells; they are also applied on ulcers and wounds and a leaf decoction is taken in cases of dysentery. Throughout tropical America, a decoction of the leaves alone or with those of other plants is imbibed either as an emmenagogue, febrifuge, tonic, cold remedy, digestive, or to clarify the urine. The leaf decoction is also employed in baths to alleviate rheumatic pain. The green fruit, very astringent, is employed against diarrhea in El Salvador. In India, the crushed ripe fruit, mixed with salt, is applied on tumors. The bark and roots are both highly astringent. The bark decoction is given as a tonic and to halt diarrhea. The root, because of its strong purgative action, is administered as a drastic treatment for dysentery and other ailments.

Annona Muricata or Sour Sop

Sour sop – Annona Muricata Other common names include: guanábana (Spanish), graviola (Portuguese), Brazilian pawpaw, guyabano, corossolier, guanavana, toge-banreisi, durian benggala, nangka blanda, sirsak, and nangka londa. In Malayalam, it is called mullaatha, literally thorny custard apple. The other lesser known Indian names are shul-ram-fal and hanuman fal. In Sri Lankan mythology, Lord Rama and his disciple Hanuman are believed to have consumed this fruit on their way to Lanka.

It is a broadleaf, flowering, evergreen tree. The beautiful, shiny-leaved Sour sop can grow up to 12 m (39 ft) tall and reach 20 cm (0.65 ft) diameter trunk. The pyramid-shaped tree branches all the way from the beginning of the trunk.
Sour sop flourishes and bears fruit throughout the year. The flowers are waxy, thick and small with a resemblance to cabbage. They might be attached either to the trunk or the branches. The exterior of a fruit is green and spiky. There’s a saying in South America, “estar en la guanábana” (to be in guanábana), meaning being in paradise.

In the Philippines, we call it guyabano.

The fruit

The large, elongated, somewhat ovaloid fruit, can be up to 12" long and 6" wide and usually weighs several pounds. The fruit is covered in small knobby spines that easily break off when the fruit is ripe. The thin, inedible, leathery green skin cuts easily to yield the large mass of cream colored, fragrant, juicy, and somewhat fibrous, edible flesh.
The fruit flesh is white, full of small black seeds. However this wicked-looking fruit tastes very pleasant. The delicious fruit can be eaten unprepared, or it can be made into juice or ice cream.

Research has shown that Sour sop has certain properties that kill cancer cells 10,000 times and more efficient than chemotherapy; and they only kill cancer cells leaving the healthy cells unharmed. This means the patient does not suffer from the side effects that chemotherapy has. One of its cancer cure properties is annonacin. Soursop is high in carbohydrates, especially fructose. It also has large amount of vitamins C, B1, and B2.
Besides this, sour sop is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent for both bacterial and fungal infections, is effective against internal parasites and worms, lowers high blood pressure and is used for depression, stress and nervous disorders.

Tasting a sour sop
Sour sop kills cancer



Images Credits:
annonaceae flower-http://www.flickr.com/photos/dinesh_valke/4666230829/
custard apple tree-http://foter.com/f/photo/7029224373/8c87b2bc8a/
annona squamosa and Sour sop - Em Cuyugan
sugar apple-Ian Maguire
Sour sop-seychellesfamilyvarley.com

Thank you. mistyleaf

Tags

Annona, Anonas, Atis, Bullocks Heart, Custard Apple, Guyabano, Mistyleaf, Soursop, Sugar Apple, Sweetsop, Tropical Fruit, Tropical Plant, Tropics

Meet the author

author avatar mistyleaf
I'm self-employed as a translator/interpreter. ' I also write at <a
href="http://www.expertscolumn.com">Expertscolumn.com</a> '

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Comments

author avatar Buzz
28th Apr 2012 (#)

A star, another fruit of your labor, sis. Nicely-written, as if of a forbidden fruit as to arouse the curiosity of the readers.:-) Congrats again.

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author avatar mistyleaf
28th Apr 2012 (#)

Thank you Brod. I really miss these fruits. If you remember, we had these trees in Minalin.

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author avatar Tess Irons
28th Apr 2012 (#)

I miss those fruits too. Good, I was able to eat sour sop last time I was in the Philippines. A well deserved star, Misty. Congrats!

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author avatar mistyleaf
28th Apr 2012 (#)

I envy you ! There is guyabano juice available in Philippine stores but I want to eat the fruit itself. Thanks Tess.

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
28th Apr 2012 (#)

This is an absolutely wonderful star page...you are amazing Mistyleaf your knowledge profound...and I love these fruits when I can find them at the farme's market....thank you so much for detailing this..

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author avatar mistyleaf
28th Apr 2012 (#)

Yes, these fruits are good for the health especially the sour sop. Thank you Cn.

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author avatar Steve Kinsman
28th Apr 2012 (#)

Very informative and so beautifully presented.Great star page mistyleaf. Thank you.

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author avatar mistyleaf
28th Apr 2012 (#)

Thank you for the encouraging comment Steve.

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author avatar mistyleaf
28th Apr 2012 (#)

Thank you very much for the star Peter.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
29th Apr 2012 (#)

Beautiful article misty...thank you :0)

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author avatar mistyleaf
29th Apr 2012 (#)

Thank you Delicia.

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author avatar Maurice G
29th Apr 2012 (#)

A first class star award, well deserved !! ps send me some fruit lol

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author avatar mistyleaf
29th Apr 2012 (#)

Thanks Maurice. ok I'll send you by e-mail. lol

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author avatar Tranquilpen
29th Apr 2012 (#)

Thank you Mistyleaf for a fascinating read I have eaten custard apple but have yet to taste the other delights which I will keep a sharp look out for.

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author avatar mistyleaf
30th Apr 2012 (#)

Oh good. Sugar apple tastes more like custard apple but sweeter. Sour sop's taste is a combination of sour and sweet. Thank you for dropping by.

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
30th Apr 2012 (#)

another comment dear Misty..I found the custard apples at the market and bought some...thank you so very much for writing this...

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author avatar mistyleaf
30th Apr 2012 (#)

wow, that's good to hear. I hope they are sweet.

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
1st May 2012 (#)

What an effort and details, mistyleaf! My range is limited - mangoes, oranges, bananas, apple to name a few. Yes, some we miss now revisit in dreams to tempt our tastebuds! siva

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author avatar mistyleaf
1st May 2012 (#)

Since I was born and raised in a tropical country, there are many fruits that I cannot find here in Japan that I am missing so much. I accidentally bumped on these fruits when I was net surfing and I thought of writing an article about them.
Thank you Siva for your comment.

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