On the Waterfront Review

Yeury By Yeury, 27th Oct 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/170z_v3x/
Posted in Wikinut>Reviews>Film & TV>Drama

TERRY: “Hey, you wanna hear my philosophy of life? Do it to him before he does it to you.”

The night after Terry and Edie stroll through the local park, Edie discovers Terry on the roof watching out for the pigeons, including Joey's. Charmed by his delicate side, she consents to go with him to a bar, where they have a cozy and intimate discussion. Terry's announcement here demonstrates the enormous philosophical difference between him and Edie.

"I coulda been a contender."

My first observation about the film is that The mise-en-scène, is not a set. Kazan and his group recorded On the Waterfront on the real docks and wharfs of Hoboken, New Jersey, in perspective of New York City. Kazan accomplishes legitimacy and coarseness because of the settings of the internal cargo holds of boats, the confined, wet spaces in which the union specialists live, and the dingy, smoky bars of the zone. Indeed, even a considerable lot of Johnny Friendly's goons were not actors. Rather, they were genuine previous heavyweight boxers who were contracted for their harsh attitude and intimidating physical prowess. A hefty portion of the longshoremen, as well, were real specialists from the Hoboken docks. The foundation sounds on the dock—ships' shrieks and chains thumping through metal circles—add to the practical aural environment.
One scene that stands out to me is the scene where Charlie and Terry are having a conversation at the back of a taxi.


TERRY: “You don’t understand. I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been someone, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let’s face it . . . It was you, Charlie.”

Terry says this to Charlie toward the end of the significantly intimate taxicab discussion where the two strained siblings are separated from everyone else. Charlie, who looks after his sibling yet hasn't paid special mind to him appropriately, is in denial as to the explanation behind Terry's fizzled boxing profession. He denounces the spoiled coach who blundered Terry's abilities. However, in truth, Charlie's relationship with Johnny Friendly implied that the union had a boxer it could control. Through Charlie, Johnny Friendly requested Terry to tank a major battle, ensuring himself a colossal result by wagering on the adversary. Despite the fact that Charlie gave Terry a share of the money., Terry states here that Charlie murdered what was truly in question—his spirit, his pride, and his self-regard. This surely understood quote uncovers the multifaceted nature of the siblings' relationship and communicates Terry's profound inward torment that the relationship likely can't be rescued. The siblings cherish one another—however Terry now recognizes his sibling's halfway obligation regarding his present tie, and he at last understands that he can get away from the mark of "bum" just through his own behavior. Kaufman used a medium-shot or more specifically a two-shot here to make the scene feel more intimate. The low lighting also compliments the shot to achieve the desired result.
Another scene I chose takes place in a meeting held by Father Barry underneath the church.

FATHER BARRY: “D & D? What’s that?”
KAYO DUGAN: “Deaf and dumb. No matter how much we hate the torpedoes, we don’t rat.”


This trade happens amid the mystery meeting the minister holds in the cellar of the church. It shows the profundity and life span of the longshoremen's tie. In spite of the fact that they all concur, where it counts, that the treatment they get from Johnny Friendly and his goons is unreasonable and cruel, standing up about it may place them in a more awful circumstance—that is, jobless or dead. Living by the code constrained on them by the degenerate union has saved their lives, yet they live in a corrupted state practically like slaves. To spare their own lives, the longshoremen agree to go about as though they see and hear nothing. The word “torpedoes” is slang for Johnny Friendly and his goons, who point weapons of sorts at the longshoremen consistently. The goons hang out on the docks as unending indications of Friendly's quality, and they have a long history of roughing individuals up. To rat intends to uncover shameful acts or transgressions to a group that is not immediately involved, for example, a legal counselor or the Waterfront Crime Commission. Kaufman uses a serious of medium shots and over-the-shoulder shots which serves the purpose of putting the audience into the Priest’s shoes. You start to sympathize with the father and what he is trying to do for these people.
The next scene features Terry and Edie at a bar where they discuss their differences in philosophy

TERRY: “Hey, you wanna hear my philosophy of life? Do it to him before he does it to you.”

The night after Terry and Edie stroll through the local park, Edie discovers Terry on the roof watching out for the pigeons, including Joey's. Charmed by his delicate side, she consents to go with him to a bar, where they have a cozy and intimate discussion. Terry's announcement here demonstrates the enormous philosophical difference between him and Edie. This difference makes their forming relationship more intense, on the grounds that to see one another they must endeavor to comprehend a new and even offensive method for living and thinking. Terry's words abridge a lifetime of being pushed around and needing to scrap for each piece and all of self-assurance. In Edie's perspective, everyone thinks about other people, while Terry pictures a no nonsense world in which individuals do what they need to do so as to survive. The shots are two continuous over-the-shoulder shots and closeup shots which really give you a feel for the emotions and relationship that is building between these two characters.

I believe this film reflects realism while using minimal camera techniques to help tell their story. Every scene is well lit enough so that you can discern the smallest details on the characters faces. Each emotion is conveyed properly and precisely so that you can either be sympathized or appalled at the action taking place on the screen. Boris Kaufman abstained from using flashy camera work and intense close-ups and instead let the characters tell their story. That is Realism.

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Classic, Drama, Entertainment, Movie, Review, Yeury

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